Gender Roles in the Nile River Valley
In Patriarchal System of Egypt, Men were more powerful than women were. But, it wasn't strongly enforced, so Women in few cases got a formal education, therefore could become scribes. Men held responsibilities for government decisions, such as becoming the Pharaoh. Pharaohs were perceived as Gods and were very high members of society, only men with a few exceptions to some women could become these leaders. Men of higher class were educated allowing them to become scribes. Scribes could write out documents of trade, or government documents. Men were also allowed to become priests. Priests learned how to write in Hieroglyphics and prayed to the Egyptian Gods and Goddesses. Below there are pictures that show Portraits of an Egyptian Priest, Scribe, and a Pharaoh. These show that men of high class could easily get these jobs and become high members of society whereas women had to work harder and be very privileged to be a member of these occupations.


A statue of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, shown wearing a beard a symbol of the Pharaoh
A statue of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, shown wearing a beard a symbol of the Pharaoh
A statue of an Egyptian scribe
A statue of an Egyptian scribe
An egyptian Preist
An egyptian Preist





Men were respected more than women, although in the city of Kush female rulers were not very uncommon. Women were allowed to become Priestesses in religious cults, allowing them some power in religion. Men were in charge of the household, and were allowed to become Pharaohs whereas most women were not, except for Queen Hatshepsut (shown below wearing a beard as a symbol of the Pharaoh.) Pharaoh's were men, except for the rare case of Queen Hatshepsut. She ruled along side her stepson Tuthmosis III as Pharaoh, this was because Tuthmosis III was too young to become ruler. She ruled from 1473-1478 B.C.E.

Queen Hatshepsut, as Pharaoh depicted wearing a beard.
Queen Hatshepsut, as Pharaoh depicted wearing a beard.